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How far down is "below"?

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Re: How far down is "below"?

Postby Hairyloon » Thu Aug 10, 2017 9:41 am

atticus wrote:How deep below ground was your wall before you demolished it?

Was not my wall, that was regarding the chap in Manchester.

Are you seriously thinking that a services cable can be a mineral seam?

Are you suggesting that copper is not a valuable mineral? If the right is to "take minerals from below the ground", then how does a line of copper fall outside of that definition?
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Re: How far down is "below"?

Postby dls » Thu Aug 10, 2017 10:44 am

Because it is very possible that it does not become 'land' legally when laid.
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Re: How far down is "below"?

Postby theycantdothat » Sat Aug 19, 2017 8:29 pm

I do not know if there is a legal definition of what a mineral is, but whatever it is, in the context of mineral rights it surely has to be something which is naturally in the land and there in sufficient quantity to be worth exploiting. Service media clearly have to be excluded.
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Re: How far down is "below"?

Postby Millbrook2 » Sun Aug 20, 2017 1:20 pm

Hairyloon wrote:
atticus wrote:How deep below ground was your wall before you demolished it?

Was not my wall, that was regarding the chap in Manchester.

Are you seriously thinking that a services cable can be a mineral seam?

Are you suggesting that copper is not a valuable mineral? If the right is to "take minerals from below the ground", then how does a line of copper fall outside of that definition?


Because refined copper in the form of a service cable is not a mineral in the sense being discussed
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Re: How far down is "below"?

Postby atticus » Sun Aug 20, 2017 1:24 pm

+1
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Re: How far down is "below"?

Postby tph » Sun Aug 20, 2017 4:25 pm

Also a service cable is likely to be owned by a service company the taking of which without consent is likely to be an offence under various acts.
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Re: How far down is "below"?

Postby Hairyloon » Sun Aug 20, 2017 6:15 pm

Millbrook2 wrote:Because refined copper in the form of a service cable is not a mineral in the sense being discussed

A perfectly sound, common sense answer, but I should not need to tell you how rare a breed common sense is, and I don't believe that one can always rely on the law to have any: it tends to work with words and I cannot see anything in the words to make the distinction.

Perhaps copper was not the best example: a copper wire remains recognisable as a manufactured item for hundreds, if not thousands of years. But what about (for example) my old hammer, lost in the mud many years ago and now barely recognisable even as a lump of iron? Is it still mine? Give it a few more years and it will be no more than iron ore and even I can't see an argument as to why it is no more than minerals.

In which case, at what point does it stop being my hammer and become minerals subject to mining rights?
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Re: How far down is "below"?

Postby atticus » Sun Aug 20, 2017 6:49 pm

I am sure that your rusty lump of iron wil one day be the foundation of a hugely profitable mining operation.

I expect that is how Rio Tinto Zinc started out.
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Re: How far down is "below"?

Postby tph » Sun Aug 20, 2017 8:09 pm

The best definition of a mineral is perhaps that provided by the British Geological Society;

A mineral is a natural substance with distinctive chemical and physical properties, composition, and atomic structure. The definition of an economic mineral is broader, and includes minerals, metals, rocks and hydrocarbons (solid and liquid) that are extracted from the earth by mining, quarrying and pumping. Economic minerals are used in a wide range of applications related to construction, manufacturing, agriculture and energy supply.

The example of the hammer is not a good one either as it would not become a mineral.
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