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Define the term "directly or indirectly" ...

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Re: Define the term "directly or indirectly" ...

Postby dls » Wed Feb 15, 2017 6:43 pm

ST
By the time you are splitting these hairs, you have lost. No court would join in.
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Re: Define the term "directly or indirectly" ...

Postby Boo » Wed Feb 15, 2017 7:21 pm

On a side note...Due to breaches and retractions of restraining orders we're looking at new orders, locally. A faster response time - orders to be enforced within 24 hours and to come with extras, for example; seizing property, fines, evictions...

The idea is to remove the control of the orders from the victim - and look at enforcing approaches to alter patterns of behaviour as well as minimising risks for kids. I looked at local figures about a month or so ago, up to 500 calls are made weekly to my local contact point regarding domestic abuse. The majority of those referrals come from the Police.

That being said, there will always be some who will breach orders and shrug at a custodial sentence.
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Re: Define the term "directly or indirectly" ...

Postby Maz JP » Wed Feb 22, 2017 8:57 am

dls wrote:ST
By the time you are splitting these hairs, you have lost. No court would join in.


Just seen this thread, and the above is the right answer. We deal with any numbers of breaches, some serious, some minor, but the reality is that the meaning of 'directly' or 'indirectly' is rarely an issue that is raised.

Facts is that when an order is imposed, the terms are very carefully explained (courts will vary in practice, but for example, I tend to go on a bit about what happens when you encounter the person who is the subject of the order in the street - cross the road etcetera etcetera), and there is really very little excuse for non-compliance, and certainly not one that resides in linguistics, as dls notes.
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