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Wallfish et al.

Re: Wallfish et al.

Postby diy » Thu Jan 05, 2017 8:43 am

I'm not sure if that is the trademarked product or not.. its very confusing. I can't see the point of creating a branded oil that is 100% another oil, unless its purely to hide the source ingredient. My suspicion is that its a way of obfuscating a use of less desirable lower costs ingredient or blend.
My suggestions are not legal advice
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Re: Wallfish et al.

Postby Hairyloon » Thu Jan 05, 2017 2:44 pm

diy wrote:I'm not sure if that is the trademarked product or not.. its very confusing. I can't see the point of creating a branded oil that is 100% another oil, unless its purely to hide the source ingredient. My suspicion is that its a way of obfuscating a use of less desirable lower costs ingredient or blend.

It seems to me to simply be a cheap bulk oil, for example for the frying of chips in. For a great many customers to a great degree it doesn't matter a fat lot what is actually in it: sunflower, rapeseed, soya are all pretty much of a muchness at that end of the market. By making a branded product out of a blend of oils they can vary the recipe without having to worry about changing the packaging.
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Re: Wallfish et al.

Postby tph » Fri Jan 06, 2017 7:48 pm

There's a market research company called BrainJuicer. As far as I am aware there methods are less direct than their name suggests.
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Re: Wallfish et al.

Postby Hairyloon » Fri Jan 06, 2017 10:30 pm

tph wrote:There's a market research company called BrainJuicer. As far as I am aware there methods are less direct than their name suggests.

We are somewhat adrift from the original question.
I imagine that both wallfish and rock salmon are by now well enough established names, but what about some novel foodstuff?
Say, for example if someone were to try to market woodlice as "land shrimps"?
Perhaps not the best example because the difference between isopods and decapods is one that I would quite happily argue as insignificant in the context, but I imagine you get the idea?
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