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Proving a document

Proving a document

Postby shootist » Thu Oct 15, 2015 8:10 am

As usual, I hope this is posted in the right arena.

An important document, for example a declaration of trust, cannot be found in the original, but copies are available. All of the many signatories cannot be easily traced, but the document needs to be validated. Would it be sufficient to have a few or as many as seems practicable of the original signatories make some sort of statement to the effect that they recognise the copy of the document as being a true copy of the document they signed? If so, is there any preferred format for doing this?
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Re: Proving a document

Postby dls » Thu Oct 15, 2015 9:46 am

is there any preferred format for doing this?


This is entirely dependent upon who might be asking. Formalities will be particular to the person requesting it.
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Re: Proving a document

Postby atticus » Thu Oct 15, 2015 10:15 am

... And why. For example the requirements may be very different if dealing with a tax point or a property sale.
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Re: Proving a document

Postby shootist » Thu Oct 15, 2015 10:52 am

OK, so it's uncertain. Could anyone volunteer a best guess solution, more as a sort of preventive measure than a solution to any particular request. No tax or sales issues need be considered for the purposes of this request. Something to give a bit of clout should the authenticity of the document be challenged.
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Re: Proving a document

Postby atticus » Thu Oct 15, 2015 11:52 am

Statutory declaration by as many signatories as humanly possible.
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Re: Proving a document

Postby atticus » Thu Oct 15, 2015 12:26 pm

Before doing that, can I ask if copies exist of the signed and dated document? If so, a declaration may be sufficient which exhibits it and explains how it came to be lost or mislaid.
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Re: Proving a document

Postby shootist » Thu Oct 15, 2015 12:41 pm

atticus wrote:Before doing that, can I ask if copies exist of the signed and dated document? If so, a declaration may be sufficient which exhibits it and explains how it came to be lost or mislaid.


Direct photocopies exist showing all signatures and the date/s but the whereabouts of the original document, some 18 years of age, is unknown and must be assumed to be lost, God only knows how, but many of the associated documents have been round the houses quite a few times.
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Re: Proving a document

Postby dls » Thu Oct 15, 2015 8:02 pm

Provenance explanation.
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Re: Proving a document

Postby theycantdothat » Fri Oct 16, 2015 8:06 am

A copy produced from the custody of a solicitor will carry more weight as will a statutory declaration made by lawyer or lawyer's employee.
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