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Court Transcript Costs

Court Transcript Costs

Postby Spankymonkey » Thu Dec 08, 2016 12:14 am

The 2005 ECHR judgement of Steel and Morris V UK, mentions that during the longest trial in English history, (the McTrial) Steel and Morris were being given daily transcripts of court proceedings for free by McDonalds lawyers. Eventually, McDonalds withdrew this, and the defendants were expected to pay around £375 for a days worth of transcripts.

However, the judgement mentioned that when they waited 21 days, the costs of the transcripts were reduced to £25.

Is this still the case? Is there any way of getting transcripts at a reduced rate?

I was also wondering if it was possible to obtain court recordings under subject access requests for just a £10 fee. Or, in the case of public hearings, why not FOI requests?
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Re: Court Transcript Costs

Postby atticus » Thu Dec 08, 2016 7:06 am

FOI requests are for documents that are already in existence.

A subject access request is for your personal data.

You may wish to study the various restrictions and exemptions in the FOI and Data Protection legislation.
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Re: Court Transcript Costs

Postby atticus » Thu Dec 08, 2016 9:29 am

The cost of transcription still varies with the urgency of the requirement. Different transcription companies charge different rates.

As we have seen this week, same day transcripts are possible.
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Re: Court Transcript Costs

Postby dls » Thu Dec 08, 2016 10:32 am

The Steel situation is many many moons ago.

The transcripts were being provided (from memory) by the other side's lawyers. They had and have no obligation to assist in this way, and if they do so, can do so on whatever terms they choose.
Lower courts will not generally have a system for recording proceedings and none for transcribing the proceedings. When they do do this it is an expensive exercise. Do not expect otherwise.
It is your job as a party to keep the best notes you can. It is difficult. I personally would prefer if the parties were free to record the case, but please understand that without the court's express permission this is an offence.
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Re: Court Transcript Costs

Postby Spankymonkey » Fri Dec 09, 2016 6:10 pm

FOI requests are for documents that are already in existence.


FOI requests are for information held, not documents. The clue is in the title Atticus. Recordings would constitute as information held.

A subject access request is for your personal data.


The recording would constitute personal data if you were the defendant or claimant.


In the magistrates' court, how could you prove that the justices or the clerk gave a verbal instruction to you during the proceedings that they shouldn't have?
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Re: Court Transcript Costs

Postby atticus » Fri Dec 09, 2016 6:30 pm

atticus wrote:You may wish to study the various restrictions and exemptions in the FOI and Data Protection legislation.
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Re: Court Transcript Costs

Postby Smouldering Stoat » Fri Dec 09, 2016 6:41 pm

Or indeed the kind of handy guide the ICO produces about FOI.

And, while the transcript may be one party's personal data, it follows that it must also be the other party's. Have they consented to that data being disclosed. Other exemptions may also apply.
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Re: Court Transcript Costs

Postby dls » Sat Dec 10, 2016 7:17 am

how could you prove that the justices or the clerk gave a verbal instruction to you during the proceedings that they shouldn't have?

As I said, you take good notes as the hearing progresses. They can be compared to those taken by the clerk, and by other other party. Cases are not always recorded.
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